Tuesday, 30 October 2018

The Geocentic Hypothesis: A summary




The ‘Geocentric Hypothesis’ was originally developed from the idea that Stonehenge’s layout may represent Neolithic ideas about our world and cosmos. 

Older monuments also have features which appear to be the remnants of experiments undertaken to find out how the world and cosmos work. The hypothesis includes various sub-hypotheses regarding these monuments. The overriding theme of the ‘Geocentric Hypothesis’ is that some monuments, especially those with more intricate designs, are associated with a desire to find out what our world is. 

Below is a list of monuments for which possible interpretations have been developed:



Newgrange:

Newgrange’s layout, arrangements and symbols are the same as those required to establish that the sun has a fixed spiral ‘orbit’. This would be necessary if people became concerned that climate change might occur if the sun’s ‘orbit’ moved further south. Its inner stone monument is demonstrated to be capable of accurate measurement of the sun’s position at Winter Solstice. 


More detail, together with a pdf explaining the features in more detail, can be found in this (2014) blog post.



Avebury

Avebury's layout appears to describe an early hypothesis that the Cosmos circled around the Earth (a ‘Geocentric’ view). This layout is similar to the later Stonehenge monument but, if it was used to develop geocentric ideas, focuses on a concern that climate change might occur if the sun’s ‘orbit’ moved further south: The layout appears to describe the sun’s position and movement at Winter Solstice. 


More detail can be found in this (2011) blog post.



Preseli

Monuments in Preseli appear to be arranged to establish that the Earth is round (hypothesis 1). If Stonehenge’s bluestones were used at Preseli, they could be arranged to form a structure that could measure the size of the world (hypothesis 2).


More detail on both hypotheses can be found in this (2018) blog post.



South Downs

Monuments along the South Downs appear to be arranged to establish the size of the world and to allow that to be described.


The amount of information (on this set of monuments) within the blog is limited. However, the detail of each monument and possible purpose is expanded upon in the book "Stonehenge: Solving the Neolithic Universe".



Stonehenge (Part 1)

The grounds of Stonehenge and its external layout appears to describe a more developed theory that the Cosmos circled around the Earth (a ‘Geocentric’ view). This layout concentrates on showing the Earth at the centre of a spherical cosmos with defined locations for each of the solstices. 


More detail on this hypothesis can be found in this (2011) blog post. An expanded description can be found in this slideshare pdf.



Stonehenge (Part 2)

Stonehenge’s internal layout appears to be arranged as a demonstration of how the sun rotates around the earth (a geocentric model). This structure would be capable of duplicating the Earth at the centre of a spherical cosmos:


This operation of this demonstrator can be difficult to understand. To prove that Stonehenge’s structure would have been capable of doing this, a utility patent application was made in 2010. More information on this patent (granted 2018) can be found in this blog post. The detail of how this works is also expanded upon in much more detail in the book "Stonehenge: Solving the Neolithic Universe".



Others

There are a number of other monuments which have features that would have been required to establish that the Cosmos is geocentric (though this is not actually true). These are yet to be written up.





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